Recent Posts

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Eden General / Re: NOISE..WTP600 Pro
« Last post by Bassmann1968 on September 17, 2018, 04:59:05 AM »
Could you take a picture of the inside and send it to me?
I need to see the transformer and wiring to the PCB.
Thanks in advance.
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Eden General / Re: NOISE..WTP600 Pro
« Last post by Paulinderwick on September 16, 2018, 04:30:21 PM »
Is it just me - postings complaining of noise but... no recordings... I'm sure most musicians these days have access to recording technology which could provide with at least a clue as to what is going on - my iphone can record sounds with a fidelity undreamed of 20 years ago, and I can use an app to record the increase in db over ambient of a noise source at the press of a button so why, oh why is there no evidence?  Only complaints???
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Eden General / Re: NOISE..WTP600 Pro
« Last post by Bassmann1968 on September 16, 2018, 04:03:16 AM »
Hi jodowd and welcome to the Garden!

How far did you lift the transformer to quit the noise?
Would that be not to high so could still close the enclosure?
Rock on!
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Eden General / Re: NOISE..WTP600 Pro
« Last post by jodowd on September 15, 2018, 07:38:16 PM »
I also have this issue with a 1 year old wtp600.  When I read this post, I did the same test...  opened the case, loosed the retainer bolt for the transformer(?? big donut shaped ball of plastic wrapped wires), then I lifted it slowly out of the amp, buzz quiets and disappears.  When I lower it back in again, buzz gets slowly louder and returns.  I have rotated it in place 360 degrees but never could find a silent spot.

Almost seems like crossover into wiring that isn't properly insulated, since moving the transformer away from the wiring makes the buzz go away.

Any other ideas here?  Sucks paying $1300 dollars for a head that sound techs don't want plugged into the mains.

Thx.
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Eden General / Eden The Metro amp problem
« Last post by mnow on September 12, 2018, 11:28:54 PM »
Have an Eden "The Metro" in the shop for repair.
Unit has been severely modded by someone and the tube channel only puts out like 7 watts.
Could really use a schematic for this if anyone has one available.
Unit was built in 1999 and serial number looks like 6052
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Eden General / Re: WT800 overheating
« Last post by Rip Van Dan on September 12, 2018, 09:38:58 PM »
Holy Crap NO!  The WT800A can not handle 4 ohms bridged. 

If I said it could, I was thinking of the WT800C with the porchlight logo.  I've been answering questions about the WT800C too and I think I got my WT800's mixed up.   

My amp has the same power system and power supply as your WT800A and it ONLY bridges to 8 ohms.  That's because both power sections have to operate at 4 ohms, which is their minimum ohms rating, to produce 8 ohms bridged.  4 ohms bridged requires those two power sections to operate at 2 ohms, which is something the WT800C can do, but the WT800A can not.

I really apologize for any confusion about that.

Dan
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Eden General / Re: still shopping for my first real bass amp
« Last post by Rip Van Dan on September 12, 2018, 09:33:55 PM »
If the cabs are the same quality (say from the same cab series from the same manufacturer), then no, the 212 will not give the volume that the 410 will.  It'll still be a great cab, but you're looking at 24" of speakers vs. 40" of speakers.  That's a very simplistic way to look at it, but it's true.  Now if you were to add another 212 then you'd easily do anything a 410 can do.  Nonetheless, a good 212 cab will cover most of the gigs you'll run into.

They are probably marketing it as better than someone else's 410.  Then power handling and sensitivity come into play.  You have to be careful with marketing statements.  The song Voo-Doo Child comes to mind... ;)

Dan
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Talk About Your Set Up. / Re: is the Eden EX210, 4 ohm, 300 watts, loud enough?
« Last post by Rip Van Dan on September 12, 2018, 09:23:40 PM »
I would probably want one additional cab for that size of a club.  I was in such a club and the Bassist was using an Eden Metro (210XLT) and had a D112XLT as an extra cab.  Filled that big club just fine.  Not sure it would have with just the 210.  Of course if you are running through an FOH and only using your cab for your stage monitor, then the single 210 should work fine.

If you look at the EX210, which comes both as a 4 ohm cab and as an 8 ohm cab, their power handling is 300-watts rms.  The SPL (sound pressure level) rating on it is 101db@1W/1M (1 watt/1 meter distant).  That's a good sensitivity rating.  About the maximum SPL you can get out of it, if everything is perfect, is going to be about 126db (pain threshold is 120db, chain saw is 110db, loud power tools are 100db, lawnmower is 90db).  126db is very loud 1-meter away from your amp, but you lose volume quickly the farther away you get from the amp.  So the size and configuration of the room itself becomes a factor. 

Everytime you double the distance form the sound source, you lose 6 db of SPL.  So here's how that goes presuming the cab actually can hit that theoretical 126db limit:

1 meter (3.28-ft)         =  126 db
2 meters  (6.56-feet)   =  120 db
4 meters (13.1-feet)    =  114 db
8 meters  (26.2-feet)   =  111 db
16 meters  (52.5-feet) =  105 db.

As far as the  4 ohm vs 2 ohm goes, the 4 ohm cab allows you to use more of your amps power by itself than an 8 ohm cab does.  For instance with my amp WT500/800, it will do 400 watts per channel at 4 ohms.  If I put an 8 ohm cab on that same channel, I will only get 240 watts out of it because of he higher resistance of the 8 ohm cab.

A LOT of amps on the market have a minimum ohms load of 4 ohms.  That means that if you have a 4 ohm EX210, you can only ever run one cab from that amp regardless of how powerful their amp is.  If you plug in a second cab, then the ohms load goes down to 2 ohms, which is well below that 4 ohm minimum rating.  That causes things to break, burn up, and release the magic smoke, if their protection circuit doesn't shut down the amp in time.

Since most people want to be able to add another cabinet for a larger club, they typically buy 8 ohm cabs. That's why the 8 ohm version is more popular.  If your amp went down to 2 ohms, then you could run two 4 ohm cabs.  Looks like your Peavey Minimax has a 4 ohm minimum ohms load rating though, so you can only ever use the one cab on your amp if you buy the 4 ohm one.
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Talk About Your Set Up. / is the Eden EX210, 4 ohm, 300 watts, loud enough?
« Last post by bushy on September 12, 2018, 07:28:30 PM »
Let's say the club is under 500 capacity. My amp is a Peavey Minimax. Reason why i brought up the Eden EX210 (4 ohm) is because I've seen it for $200 brand new. The reason must be because everyone would rather opt for the 8 ohm version, which is why the 8 ohm version cost about twice as much.
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Talk About Your Set Up. / Re: Would I need additional "head" when adding additional cabs?
« Last post by bushy on September 12, 2018, 07:12:19 PM »
Was hoping to get the Eden EX210 which is now only $200 brand new, but I realized why the price drop, it's a 4 ohm! The 8 ohm is still about double the price!

Actually the E300 does have a D.I. out.  It is on the front of the amp and just says "line out".  That is what's known as a "balanced" output that is used to connect to PA mixers/soundboards.

Info on the E300 says it has both a speakon and a 1/4" output.  Every picture I see just has the  1/4" output and not any speakon outputs.

If you get the EX410-sc4, that is a 4 ohm cab and you can't use any other cabs with it on the E300 amp because it will already be operating at its minimum ohms load rating.  If you add another cab, it will drive the amp below its minimum ohms load rating and things will start to melt and smoke (a very bad thing).

Ohms rating for a cab is NOT variable.  A cab is typically either 4 ohm or 8 ohm.  It doesn't magically change by hooking it up to an amplifier.  The Solid State amplifiers (such as the E300) do automatically adjust their power output according to the ohms load you put on it.  If you hook up two 8 ohm cabinets, that puts a 4 ohm load on the amp.  The cabs are still 8 ohms each but the amp sees a 4 ohm load because you are using two of them hooked up in a parallel (industry standard) connection.

So you could hook up two of the 8 ohm version of the EX210 cabs to your amp and it would give you the same ohms load as the one 4 ohm EX410-sc4.  Using two of the 210's would be just as loud running one of the 410's.   

If you got the 4 ohm version of the EX210, you could ONLY use that one cab.  It will be a little louder than using a single 8 ohm version of the same, but only about 3db.  So, don't do that.

Dan
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