Author Topic: Getting studio quality sustain live  (Read 1621 times)

Offline 63p-bass

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Getting studio quality sustain live
« on: August 09, 2015, 06:32:58 AM »
Every once in a while I want some sustain that will hold strong for a measure or two. Some tunes require it during the whole song.
A new, crisp set of round strings seems to be a given, and I think I need a compression pedal, but which one? Maybe another pedal as well?
Here's a link to Etta James' Ta Ta You for example.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjhV9JFry_Q
Jim

WT-405, WT550,
TN 226, Aguilar TH500
D112XST8, D112XLT8
EVM 15 in custom Theil cabs (x2)

'85 Fender Japan Jazz '75 Reissue
'06 Fender Am FSR Precision

Offline 63p-bass

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Re: Getting studio quality sustain live
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2015, 06:53:15 AM »
Maybe a nice 5 string is the answer?
Jim

WT-405, WT550,
TN 226, Aguilar TH500
D112XST8, D112XLT8
EVM 15 in custom Theil cabs (x2)

'85 Fender Japan Jazz '75 Reissue
'06 Fender Am FSR Precision

Offline Rip Van Dan

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Re: Getting studio quality sustain live
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2015, 11:44:44 AM »
That amount of sustain has a lot to do with the wood of the bass, especially the neck.  I know the neck on my '78 Fender Jazz is all maple whereas the neck on my '65 Fender Jazz had a rosewood fingerboard.  My '65 didn't have nearly the sustain that my current maple-necked Fender does.  It's the only reason I'm not still crying over my stolen '65 (stolen in 1976).  My 78 has great sustain even with round wound strings.

You could certainly use a compressor to get that sustain, but I think you would need one with threshold, ratio, attack, and decay to get near that sound.   Getting the sustain is no big deal with a compressor but getting decent attack and then sustain is a big deal.   A compressor with a "soft knee" switch and threshold and ratio might do it.  It doesn't sound like he's using a compressor to me but as the saying goes "using a compressor well makes it sound like you are not using a compressor at all."

Also, I would be amazed if that fellow was using round wound strings.  Just sounds like flatwound strings to me.  I don't think you can get that sound out of round wound strings.

So I'd say most of that sustain comes from the wood on his bass while playing flatwound strings.  A good compressor will get you close, but not sure a stompbox compressor will do it.

Dan
Rip Van Dan
Dan Gracia
'82 US-made Fender Jazz Bass with maple neck
5-string Rogue LX405 Pro (Surprisingly good "no-name" bass)
WT500/800 Highwayman (signature model)
D.N.S 410-8, Eden EX112 x2
Line6 G10s wireless
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Offline 63p-bass

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Re: Getting studio quality sustain live
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2015, 07:39:30 AM »
Seems the more I learn, the more things I find that I don't know.
I once had a Squier 5 string VM for a little while (maple board) that had sustain for days and traded it for a bass I wanted more. I have regretted that trade.
It stinks living in an area with limited access to gear.
Thanks for your words Dan.
Jim

WT-405, WT550,
TN 226, Aguilar TH500
D112XST8, D112XLT8
EVM 15 in custom Theil cabs (x2)

'85 Fender Japan Jazz '75 Reissue
'06 Fender Am FSR Precision