Author Topic: The Big Sticky Thread of BASS FAQ's!  (Read 37212 times)

Offline Bryan316

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The Big Sticky Thread of BASS FAQ's!
« on: April 30, 2009, 07:57:44 AM »
Allright folks... it seems to me that there's a serious need of a SERIOUS all-bass-gear-related FAQ thread.  Or, a bass player's online toolbox.

I've created posts that others have found useful, I've read posts that I've found useful, and I've come across topics that get re-hashed far too often that a simple go-here-first list would really help.

So... time to resurrect some previous old-thread posts and current recent posts, to build a thread filled with useful tutorials, explanations, picstories, and even product reviews we've all found useful.

Now, I don't want this thread filled with responses saying WOW I NEEDED THAT THANKS!  I just want a thread that's filled with the good stuff.  If this works the way I plan it to, I hope it can get stickied and kept up-to-date when we all post good stuff that should be archived and kept handy for those who need help on basics to super-advanced stuff.

We'll try to keep each individual post based on a particular topic.  If we find stuff that needs to be added to a topic, we'll go back and edit posts to fill them in and tag em as UPDATES.

Right now, I can already think of my Garden Hose explanation of Ohm's Law, my speaker casters upgrades, and my brother's fretboard cleaning and care thread from another forum that I'm about to shamelessly steal.  Heh heh.

Allright, time to start this sucker!


SPEAKERS, OHMS, AMP LOADS, and YOU!
UPGRADING YOUR SPEAKER CABINET'S CASTERS
MODIFYING 1/4" SPEAKER PLUGS TO NEUTRIK SPEAKON PLUGS
THOROUGH FRETBOARD CARE
HOW TO POST IMAGES
ROUTINE MAINTENANCE FOR CABLES, JACKS, AND CRACKLY GEAR
HOW TO SOLDER CORRECTLY
HOW TO CORRECTLY INSTALL SCHALLER STRAP LOCKS
HOW TO UPGRADE YOUR CABINET FROM BANANA POSTS TO SPEAKONS
BIAS SETTING E300T
« Last Edit: August 19, 2013, 02:48:01 AM by Bassmann1968 »

The new full-length album RECURRING THEMES out... Wait for it.... RIGHT NOW!
Go to www.ImminentSonicDestruction.com to order!!!
Eden WT550, WTB400

Offline Bryan316

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The Big Sticky Thread of BASS FAQ's!
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2009, 07:59:23 AM »
SPEAKERS, OHMS, AMP LOADS, and YOU!


Time for the guitar electronics 101 class.  Here we go.

Speakers are typically built to create a certain load on the amplifier.  The most common designs create a 4-ohm or 8-ohm load per speaker, some 16 or even 32 ohms.  Notice the multiples of 2.

Ohm's Law is a slightly complicated formula to calculate a load on an electrical circuit.  It works the same for speakers as it does for basic resistors in a circuit:



In the simplest example, two speakers, here's how it works.  If you wire up two speakers of X resistance (measured in ohms) you get a certain value of resistance in the circuit, depending on how you wire it up.  If you run the speakers in series, you're summing the loads, or adding them together.  Example: 4ohm series 4ohm = 8ohm total.  Two 4ohm speakers wired in series creates a total load of 8 ohms.  However, if you wire them up in parallel, you're more-or-less halving, or dividing the loads.  4ohm parallel 4ohm = 2 ohms.

Why?

Here's why.


I'll give you time to go get a beer.


Okay.

Consider electricity as a garden hose.  Your power amp is the faucet.  Voltage is how much pressure is in the water supply, current is how fast the water is flowing down the hose, and resistance is how much you're restricting or pinching the hose.

When you wire stuff up in a circuit, consider how you'd hook things up to a garden hose.  First, imagine your speakers are kinks in the garden hose.  If you have two kinks in the hose, it affects the water flow by restricting, or resisting, the flow, or current, of water.  If you have two kinks in series in a hose, that means two kinks back to back, right?  Then you're restricting the hose twice as much as one kink.  That means you're totaling, or summing, the resistance in that hose.  So that means, 4 ohms worth of kink in the hose plus another 4 ohms worth of a kink, means a total of 8 ohms of kinking, or resistance.

Let's imagine you have a manifold, or a Y-splitter at your faucet.  Then you hook two hoses up, and turn on the water.  You've got the same amount of pressure/voltage, pushing into each hose/circuit.  That means, the effect of kinking each hose, has less of an effect of the flow/current of water than kinking one hose.  So then you're halving the resistance at the faucet, before getting to the Y-splitter.  So, 4ohms worth of kink in one hose and 4ohms worth of kink in the other hose actually has HALF of the resistance in the water flow!  4 and 4 halves the amount of restriction/resistance of just one of the kinks, meaning you get a 2ohm total amount of resistance in the hoses at the faucet.

Now... according to Ohm's Law, you can only get certain combinations of loads per number of speakers.  We'll start with a 2x10 cabinet.

If you want an 8-ohm cabinet, there are two ways to get that total load.  Either two 4-ohm speakers wired series to add up to a total 8 ohms, or two 16-ohm speakers wired parallel to half down to a total of 8 ohms.

If you want a 4-ohm cabinet, there's only ONE way to get that.  Two 8ohm speakers wired parallel to half down to a total of 4 ohms.  Why only one way?  Cuz speaker manufacturers don't build speakers with a 2-ohm load.  The nature of winding up copper around the voice coil creates resistance that the amplifier sees, and you just can't wind up a small amount of copper wire to only create 2 ohms of resistance, and still create a strong enough effect inside the magnetic field to move that voice coil.  So you can't series together two 2-ohm speakers to create a 4-ohm cabinet.

But.. you CAN make a 2-ohm total load cabinet, by wiring two 4-ohm speakers in parallel to half the load to a 2-ohm total.


What about a 4x10 cabinet, you say?  Here's the possibilities:

The typical 4x10 cabinet is a combination of series AND parallel wiring.  Stay with me here.  We'll start with a 4-ohm cabinet.  How do you get four speakers to total 4 ohms?  Well, you can start with 4-ohm speakers (remember we can't get 2-ohm single speakers?) and add two together in series to get a series-total 8-ohm load.  Then you add the other two together in series, for another 8-ohm load.

Now, think of those 8-ohm series pairs of speakers, as EACH being a SINGLE TOTAL LOAD.  Like a SINGLE 8-ohm speaker.  That means, we can wire those two 8-ohm loads in parallel, to half themselves down to a 4-ohm load.  VOILA!  Four 4-ohm speakers total 4-ohms.  First you add them together, then you divide them together.  Funny, huh?  Took a while for me to understand the common sense aspect of this.  Add together, then divide together.  :)

Now then, a very common theme around here lately.... those pesky 8-ohm cabinets.  How do those work?  They are four 8-ohm speakers, in two series pairs creating 16 ohms, then paralleled together to drop back down to 8-ohms again.  But where's the magical 2-ohm cabinet modification come from?  Instead of pairing speakers in series and then paralleling them, we're hooking ALL FOUR SPEAKERS IN PARALLEL.  Yup, this is where Ohm's Law gets funky.

The truth behind Ohm's Law, is the actual way you calculate parallel circuits.  You see this in more than just two loads being halved.  It's a far more complicated formula, shown here:

1/Rt = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + 1/R3 + 1/R4 + 1/R5....

What you're doing, is adding fractions together to get the total load.  When you add fractions, you get larger fractions, right?  A quarter plus a quarter is a half, right?  Well if you take the ohms ratings of speakers, you treat them like fractions!  Lets add two 8-ohm speakers in parallel.  Like stated above, two 8-ohm speakers are halved to 4 ohms.  Right?

1/Rt = 1/8 + 1/8 = 1/4

Therefore, Rt is equal to 4.  4 ohms.  So you're just flipping the ohms ratings of parallel-wired speakers into fractions, do your calculation, then flip it back to get the actual number.

Let's try three 8-ohm speakers:

1/Rt =  1/8 +  1/8 +  1/8 =  3/8
1/Rt = .125 + .125 + .125 = .375

So, if you invert 3/8 or .375 back around, you get 8/3, or 2.66666 ohms.  That's the funky number to remember when hooking up three speakers together like some guys here do with three D112XLT cabs.

Now then, back to the 410 cab wired to 2 ohms.  If each speaker is wired in parallel:

1/Rt  =  1/8 + 1/8 + 1/8 + 1/8  =  4/8  ==>INVERT==>  8/4  =  2 ohm total load!

So there.  You can take a "weak" 8-ohm cabinet, rewire all the speakers in parallel, to get a powerhouse 2-ohm cabinet.  BUT ONLY IF YOUR AMP CAN RUN AT 2 OHMS!  Example, the WT550.


Holy crap, I just typed up a term paper.  Craaaaap.

I thoroughly expect seven posts to appear in this thread, since I started typing this shenanigans, but I hope that others will do a forum search in the future and find this useful.  Besides... I wasn't about to STOP typing!

Speakers for n00bs.  LOL



But to get back to your question of your 210XLTs rewired to 4ohms, nope.  Impossible.  Either 8ohms or 2ohms.  So to pair your 212XLT-4 to your WT550, you'll need to replace the drivers in your 210XLT-8 (presumably loaded with two 16-ohm speakers paralleled to 8 ohms) with two 8-ohm speakers, paralleled to 4 ohms.

THEN you'll get your 212XLT/210XLT rig running at 2-ohms to get 750 watts from your WT550, like I'm currently running.

And then you'll know my happiness.  Oh sweet 212/210 rig, how do I love thee, let me count the ways.  One, two, ONE TWO THREE FOUR!!!
« Last Edit: June 09, 2009, 10:39:21 AM by Bryan316 »

The new full-length album RECURRING THEMES out... Wait for it.... RIGHT NOW!
Go to www.ImminentSonicDestruction.com to order!!!
Eden WT550, WTB400

Offline Bryan316

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The Big Sticky Thread of BASS FAQ's!
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2009, 08:08:58 AM »
UPGRADING YOUR SPEAKER CABINET'S CASTERS

First of all, the pre-carnage battlefield of parts and tools.  Forgot to show the oak dowel I bought for plugging the post holes.  Sue me.




Here you see the caster, the baseplate, and a background of whoopteedoo, stop paying attention to the man behind the curtain!  You can see how the caster would look if you just mounted it straight to the cabinet, as opposed to using the removable baseplate.  Not a lot of height difference.  It accounts for MAAAYBE 3/8" once the caster's snapped in place.  Oh, that'll really kill your tone, man!!!




The baseplate, the witness marks of the caster plug cup, and the plastic corner.




Here's how I'm mounting my baseplates.  Tight up against the plastic corner, sorta-kinda set away from the front and back edges just so it's not such an eyesore or would scrape your foot if you kicked it or if Stormtroopers were scouting the venue you're playing and spotted the shiny zinc plating of that edge and reported you to Lord Vader.


Here's the wooden dowel, 5/8" diameter, cut about 3/4" long, and another dowel already hammered into place.  No, didn't paint it black, that would require me putting forth some kind of effort.  I'm too lazy.  Waitaminnit... I just typed up this whole friggin' tutorial....




Here's the screws I bought.  Wood screws, flathead screwdriver, rounded over, VERY aggressive screw threads that really bite into the wood.  I'm sure if I looked harder, I coulda found screws this good with Phillips heads or something better.  But these work.  Shu'up.  You can see that I already predrilled some holes and started a few into the first baseplate.  ALSO NOTE that I aligned the baseplate with the retaining spring inwards, cuz there was a close tolerance between the base of the caster sliding into the baseplate, and the top of the plastic corners' ridges.  So I have it set so I unclip all the casters inwards towards the center of the cabinet's bottom.




Here we go, popping the first caster in place, and how it fits...






And a close-up for you skeptics, of how this retaining spring actually holds the caster in place.









And finally, everything assembled!  Quit looking at the dusty fingerprints inside my ports.  You're supposed to notice the unpainted dowel rods, damnit.






Remember, when you're selecting removable caster bases, make sure to note the size of the compatible caster plate.  There are industry standards for those dimensions and hole patterns, so get the right matches when selecting which caster you want.

I got these polyolefin non-marking casters DIRT CHEAP on clearance for $2.49 each from www.GreatLakesCaster.com , the baseplates were $5.00 each from www.reliablehardware.com , and the screws and oak dowel from Home Depot for around $5.00.  That's a $35 upgrade, before shipping costs.  After two gigs now, I'm infinitely glad I upgraded these.


UPDATE!

The bulk of the spring plates interfering with stacking cabs.

Solution:  HUGE RUBBER FEET.

I ain't bought none yet, cuz I'm a lazy bastard, and run my 212 on the floor anyways.  Even after raising the cab a full inch I don't notice ANY loss in low end!  So I'm not bothering.  But for those who need to retain stackability, use either 7/8" diameter 1/2" tall rubber feet,  or use 1.5" diameter 13/16" tall rubber feet.

As for the part number of my 4" polyolefin casters, they were clearance items so I snagged enough for two cabs.  Put them on my cab and Kevin's 5150 cab.  He loved it.  Kicked his cab across the shop floor over welding hoses air hoses dirt debris and a plate of steel, not to mention the cracks in the pavement.

But if you want a few suggestions:

3-1/2" aluminum hub rubber tread casters at $10.00 each


Here's my caster, dunno if they'll have enough left, 4 x 1.25 Polyolefin Wheel Swivel Caster

Dirt cheap 3" casters

Dirt cheap 4" casters

If you go float around Great Lakes Caster's website, you can go to General Duty, Medium Duty, or any of the weight ranges, and the side of the screen pops a Product Filter.  You can filter them down to any category like wheel diameter, wheel material, bearing style, hub material, anything.  Go look for what you like, and what you can afford.  Hints:  4" rolls over concrete seams and cracks WONDERUFLLY, polyurethane leaves marks like sneakers scuffing the floor, polyolefin is mark-free, cast-iron hubs are overkill, wider wheels don't grab into cracks and seams as easily.


By the way... for you tilt-back crazies who wanna really mod yo stuff...

Large Recessed Tilt Caster Housing, 220 lbs. Capacity



UPDATE!

If you don't want to hack your cabinet and leave it in original condition, I've seen THE ULTIMATE hand truck.... lemme see if I can punch up some images of this Autobot of dollys...


http://www.magliner.com

http://www.magliner.com/product/gemini.htm





These puppies are so fun to goof around with!  Not only are they brilliantly designed, but they got MAD weight capacity.  There's two sizes.  I tried to find flaws in them when I saw them at GLC's showroom, but they really are amazing.  EXPENSIVE!  Allow me to repeat that.  EXPENSIVE!  $300 and up for the Gemini Jr and Sr.  But boy oh boy are they lightweight sturdy and uber-handy.


UPDATE!

Bass Mayhem's photo of his permanently-mounted upgraded casters!




UPDATE!


Our Aussie Extraordinaire Gruntolio has upgraded TWO of his cabinets!  From his picstory thread:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Alright......After seeing Bryan's caster mod more than a year ago I've finally got my lazy lazy backside around to doing this to my 410XLT & 410XST.
A Few weeks back I placed an order for my casters and caster plates from reliable hardware in the USA, because I haven't been able to find anyone in OZ that carries this sprin loaded caster system.
I was pretty impressed with Bryan's mod, so here goes![8D]

I dragged my cabs down to our new rehearsal space as we've got an abundance of tools down there whilst we are knocking our studio together. I started with the 410XST first.

Step 1
Get some tunes crankin on the PA. I plugged in my iPod and dialed up a bit of Audioslave to get me pumped!!! Hell Yeah!!


Step 2
Remove the old buggered caster sockets.

Here the remains of one of the old sockets that was typical of pretty much all 8 of them from the 410XLT & 410XST cabs.........Note to Eden...This took less than 6 months for them to get like this and I babied them like hell![V]


Here's the New heavy duty 3.5 inch casters & plate.


Step 3
Measure n cut some dowells to plug the holes left by the old sockets.

Now the XST cab had 20mm holes drilled and silly Grunt only took measurements of the XST cab holes before bolting off the the hardware store to buy the appropriate diameter dowell rod. When I removed the sockets from the XLT I found the holes were drilled at approx 17mm.
I brought 19mm thick dowell rod and wrapped some of that thin white plumbing tape around each one to give me a real snug fit before tapping them into place on the XST cab.
Step 4 - tap dowells into place.

On the XLT cab I decided to plug the holes with some wood putty. The caster plates are going to be covering them anyways so either method works fine. I just couldn't be assed trying to sand down my dowells another 2mm when I'm not even going to see them later...[:0][:D]

Step 5

I Aligned my caster plates where I planned to fix them to the bottom of the cabs. I pre-drilled holes for my timber screws to drive in with the cordless drill.
I used some wide flat headed timber screws 30mm in length. These did come through the bottom a little but I couldn't get anything smaller that seemed sturdy enough to hold. You could possibly get away with reusing the old screws from the previous sockets + a washer.


Step 6
Once all caster plates are screwed into place, it's the moment of truth!

Hell yeah! Like a cock in a sock![:0][:D]


All together now!



Errrm.....will someone quite messing with the bloody camera and turn me up the right way!!!


Opps Sorry! There we go little fella![:o)]


Ready to Roll n Rock!!!


Bloody Ripper work Gruntollio! Now go spend some of that cash mate! You've earned it!!!



NOTE:  The screws Grunty used are also sometimes called Lath Screws.  They can be found for screwing framework together that uses stamped galvanized steel screws.  They're hella-strong and have very low-profile heads on them.







UPDATE!

Steve "Cunno" Cunningham (user name Rocksolid) found caster mounting plate products made by Penn-Elcom, world-reknown manufacturer and supplier of hardware for flight cases, musical equipment, and transportation products.  NICE!!!

http://www.penn-elcom.com/product/hardware/castors-amp-wheels/miscellaneous-castors-amp-accessories/w0090/hd/2112/
« Last Edit: January 17, 2012, 01:24:31 PM by Bryan316 »

The new full-length album RECURRING THEMES out... Wait for it.... RIGHT NOW!
Go to www.ImminentSonicDestruction.com to order!!!
Eden WT550, WTB400

Offline Bryan316

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The Big Sticky Thread of BASS FAQ's!
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2009, 08:47:11 AM »
MODIFYING 1/4" SPEAKER PLUGS TO NEUTRIK SPEAKON PLUGS


This is for all you guys who are scared to upgrade to Speakon connectors, simply because you've never used Speakons, or don't want to spend more money on new speaker cables.

Don't have to!

Just upgrade them!

"But why do I really need Speakons?"

This isn't a NECESSARY upgrade.  It is a SAFETY upgrade.  For quite a few reasons.

First, electrocution.  It is very easy to physically touch both the sleeve and tip of a speaker cable when fiddling around.  If the amp's on, and you touch them together, your finger's going to HATE you.  If you're touching ground, you're whole body is going to HATE you.  Speakon connections are inherently designed with plastic shrouding around the contacting terminals inside the plugs/jacks.  You'd have to stick a paper clip in there to electrocute yourself.

Second, cabinet popping.

When your sound guy's crawling around on stage to fix drum mics and he trips on your speaker cable and yanks the 1/4" plug out of the jack, you get that pop.  That pop is HORRIBLE for speaker cabs.  Why?  Because the design of the 1/4" phone jack actually allows the tip and sleeve to momentarily, instantly touch themselves together inside the jack of your cabinet.  It happens when you plug in and when you unplug.  If your amp is running full-power, and that cable gets yanked, that pop can be very hard on your speakers.  With Speakons, you can easily and safely unplug a speaker cab even with the amp going full-power.  Plugging in is safe as well.  You won't get the cabinet pop.

Third, Yank-proof connections.

Speakons have to be twisted into place after you insert them.  They also all have a safety lock to keep them from untwisting.  You have to go through a lot of effort to accidentally unplug your speaker cable from your cab or amp.  If someone snags the speaker cable lightly, it won't instantly disconnect you, they'll just snag it, trip a bit, and everything will be fine.  Of course, this will NOT save you from the drunk in the bar snagging full-strength on your cable.  Most likely, it'll yank on your rig quite hard.  So don't use super-long cables when your cab/amp connections are only 3 feet apart.  For a PA system, it's wise to keep long runs of cable from getting tripped over anyways.  So leave slack for them.

Now then, how do we do the upgrade?

Simple.  We directly rip off my brother's thread over on www.sevenstring.org and their forum's Workbench, with plenty of tutorials and picstories about gear.  These photos were taken when we upgraded his Mesa 412 guitar cabinet to have Speakons, and then chopped his speaker cables to match.

Time to void some warranties!!  First, we take our Monster P500 10' speaker cables.  Why Monster?  Cuz they were in the Clearance Bin at Guitarded Center and were dirt cheap.  NOT because we buy into the Monster hype!


And we cut the ends off!



Slide the blue collet down the cable:


Next, we'll have to trim back the rubber:


And expose the inner wires


Next, we have to use a small screwdriver to open up the jack to get to the wire mounts. There's a little tab on the grey collet that you have to push in with the screwdriver.


Here you can see the set screw that holds the wires in place (this means NO SOLDER! YAY!)


This is where you're going to slide the speaker wires into:


After cutting some of the inner shielding off in order to expose the copper, you just align the wires and slide them in. There's labeling on the jack itself say "1+" and "1-", the red goes to the + and the black to the -  Now, some speaker cables will have a black and white wire inside.  Doesn't matter.  All that matters here, is that the SAME COLOR goes to the SAME POLARITY.  If you have white, then white goes to +1 on BOTH ends.


Clamp them bitches down tight (remember, there's no solder in these jacks, so you wanna make sure they don't go anywhere):


Now you're ready to close the jack up:


Slide the grey plastic collet back over the original tab:


And screw the blue collet onto the jack, and you have the finished product. 1/4" jacks FTL!!



Now, there's a few different Speakon connectors.  To be very specific and clear up any confusions, these photos show the two most common types of Speakon plugs, and WHY they're different.

First off, the original NL2FC connector.  It's a two-terminal connector, designed for a single speaker signal.  Only two wires inside a speaker cable, for all simple speaker cabinet connections:


Second, is the NL4FC connector.  This connector is designed for bi-amped 2-way cabinets, such as PA system loudspeakers with a midrange woofer and highrange tweeter horn.  Typically, these setups have a dedicated amplifier for the woofer and another dedicated amplifier for the tweeter.  That means, two amps going through one speaker cable, so the NL4 has FOUR terminals inside, for amp 1 and amp 2, tagged as +1-1 and +2-2.


The OTHER common use for these NL4 connectors is for bridging amplifiers with two channels, for a single high-power feed to a cabinet or set of cabinets.  Some amplifiers are designed to allow one NL4 Speakon connector to use the dedicated Bridged output Speakon jack for ONLY high-power speaker cabinets, so they connect this particular NL4 jack to the hot positives of each channel's amplifier outputs.  Kind of how old amps had banana plugs with red and black ends, and let you connect a single cable to the reds of both channels, the NL4 is connecting to the two red hots of each channel.  However, the confusion enters here:  The NL4's wires are specifically connected to the +1 and +2 of the connectors.

Why?

Safety.  If you attach a standard NL2 connector to the bridged output accidentally, you will NOT make the terminal connections inside the amp.  The NL2's terminals are located in specific points of the jack, and the NL4's terminals match these, for ONLY the +1 and -1 terminals.  The +2 and -2 terminals cannot connect or touch the terminals of a NL2 connector.  This is a specific inherent safety design.  Since NL4's still have the same +1-1 terminals in the same locations, NL4 plugs can still be used on NL2 jacks.  Also, you can have NL4 jacks on a cabinet and still power it with a NL2 plug.  BUT, that NL2 plug will ONLY send power to the +1-1 terminals of that NL4 jack.

So inside that bridged power amp, that NL4 connector is sending its bridged high-output juice to ONLY the +1 and +2 connections of the jack.  That means, the only way to milk that jack is with a NL4 plug, with two wires connected to +1 and +2.  A standard NL2 will only connect the +1 wire, and nothing will be connected to the +2 jack.  So a standard NL2 two-lead speaker cable cannot send juice from a bridged NL4 jack.  It MUST use a bridged-only speaker cable with two leads connected to +1 and +2 of a NL4 plug.  So you can't accidentally send high-power juice through a light-weight speaker cable to a small speaker cabinet that wouldn't handle that bridged output's super-high wattage and blow that little cab.  It's a safety feature, to protect your small cabs from big wattage.  However, if you've got heavy-duty speaker wire in a bridged-only cable, leading to multiple small cabinets daisy-chained to make a high-wattage-capable array of speakers, then you'll be fine.  But the bridged-only cable and the NL4 connections are designed to MAKE SURE you know you're plugging into that bridged-output, or else it just won't let you work.

NOTE!  BIG FAT NOTE!  BIG FAT BOLDED UNDERLINED NOTE!!

NONE OF EDEN'S BRIDGED OUTPUTS USE THE NL4 CONNECTORS!  NONE OF THEM!

This means, regular-duty NL2 Speakon cables will work just fine for the bridged outputs.  Eden specifically opted to not bother with this safety convention, since none of their amps are super-super-SUPER high wattage outputs like many PA designed dedicated power amps capable of truly destroying a small cabinet.  Eden's hottest amps in bridged mode put out from 800 to 1100 watts, which is still within a safety margin for using in standard small cabs like single or dual driver speaker cabinets.  However, some PA power amps can easily put out between 2000 and 4000 watts!  THAT TRULY NEEDS SOME SAFETY CHECKS!

So.  If you go shopping for a new speaker cable for your Eden amp, and plug it in and nothing works, check to make sure you didn't buy a bridged-only speaker cable.  And if you're bridging your Eden amp and it doesn't work, you've grabbed a bridged-only NL4 cable and don't need it, use the regular NL2 cable.

BUT... your PA amp's bridged output will most likely need that bridged-only NL4 cable.

So.  KNOW YOUR BRIDGED OUTPUT.  Whatever amp you're using, learn whether that bridged output needs a regular Speakon cable, or a Bridged Only Speakon cable.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2009, 09:48:56 AM by Bryan316 »

The new full-length album RECURRING THEMES out... Wait for it.... RIGHT NOW!
Go to www.ImminentSonicDestruction.com to order!!!
Eden WT550, WTB400

Offline Bryan316

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The Big Sticky Thread of BASS FAQ's!
« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2009, 10:24:59 AM »
THOROUGH FRETBOARD CARE


I'm directly linking over to my brother's tutorial thread over at SevenString.org since it's such a comprehensive and complete explanation.  Not really gonna bother cutting and pasting portions of it here, because the WHOLE POST is worth reading.

Fretboard Care at SevenString.org's Workbench Forum


NOTE:  The use of fretboard conditioner or lemon oil or linseed oil or ANY oils is for open-grain unsealed fretboards.  You do NOT want to use conditioners or oils on a sealed maple fretboard!  Don't use conditioners or oils on ANY maple fretboard!  All the other steps of removing grime and polishing the frets are perfectly safe to follow.

Also, dyeing a rosewood fretboard jet-black is not necessary.  But it DOES look good.  Heh heh.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2009, 02:16:47 PM by Bryan316 »

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Offline Bryan316

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« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2009, 03:39:50 PM »
HOW TO POST IMAGES OF YOUR GEAR


Allright it's impossible to correctly TYPE the method to include the code to post an image, without the image appearing, or syntax errors deleting the code tags and making them disappear.

So... SCREEN CAPS!


First off, let's start by making a new post.



The arrow shows which icon to push, to get the Image tags.  You can just type them as well, it'll work nicely. and is sometimes faster.

The hardest part, is not screwing up the brackets.



Now, where to put an image?

Well we'll use a website called ImageShack.  http://www.imageshack.us









You'll see on this page, a preview of the image you just uploaded, and a TON of different lines you can copy and paste.  The arrow points to the most trouble-free, least-complex way to do it.  This arrow points to the actual raw location of the image on the internet.  Direct link straight to it.  This is what you wanna copy/paste in between the brackets.




You can just post it immediately, or click Preview to make sure you did it right:





And to prove it worked, here's my little Air Force star image:




Quite easy.  Can upload and link and post an image in less than a minute.  Stays on the Imageshack servers as long as it's accessed regularly, or, you can start an Imageshack account and keep EVERY image you ever uploaded all neat and tidy.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2009, 02:17:31 PM by Bryan316 »

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Offline Bryan316

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« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2009, 10:37:42 AM »
ROUTINE MAINTENANCE FOR CABLES, JACKS, AND CRACKLY GEAR


Sometimes our gear starts to cut out on us.  Is it bad gear?  Bad cables?  Bad jacks?  Do I need to repair this amp?  Do I need to solder a new output jack on my bass?  Do I need to replace all my cables?


HOLD IT STOP RIGHT THERE.


Let's get loud and clear here.  No, seriously.  Loud and clear!  And for your signal chain to be loud and clear, we need it to be CLEAN.

Time to CLEAN YOUR GEAR.

And I'm not talking about washing your sweat rags after the show, or brushing cat fur off your cabinets.  I'm talking about your signal chain, and EVERY point in-between your fingers and your ears.

The #1 culprit for failing signals, is DIRTY CONNECTIONS.  Simple as that.  Dirty input jacks, dirty output jacks, dirty cable plugs, dirty control knobs and pots, dirty speaker cables... It's all about grease and grime and debris and residue and gunk all over your very tiny contact points, where your electrical signal conducts through your gear.

And the solution is:


It is a solvent AND an electrically conductive agent.  IT will dissolve grease and grime and loosen up microscopic particles, while leaving behind a clean surface AND an electrically conductive chemical film that helps your connections.


Radio Shack sells a two-pack of the Red and Gold:


Use the red for cleaning, and afterward use the gold for protecting and improving the conductivity of your connections.


Get this stuff from Radio Shack or any electronics store.

Spray down a Q-tip and get it soaked and completely red.

Shtick the Q-Tip into the jack and clean everything inside.

Spray your cable plug, and twist it clean with some toilet paper.

Spray the plug again, and stick it in and out of the input jack of the amp.

Do the same for every in/out jack and every plug, on a yearly basis, as part of regular maintenance or any time you get crackly signal problems.

If your control knobs or switches give you problems as well, here's where to spray them:



If you have a pedalboard that has cables that you don't always plug/unplug, don't worry about them, dirt and oil and grease doesn't get in there.  Only the connections that get used over and over all the time.  Same as in your rack.  If you have components that don't get plugged/unplugged, there's very little opportunity for gunk to get inside there.  Always start with connections that get used and abused every time you setup and tear down.

Believe it or not, most of these dirty jack problems, are caused by your hands' natural oils.  Your sweaty hands and oily fingerprints leave residue on your plugs, and the crap scrapes off inside the jacks.  Every time you drop your instrument cable on the ground as you pack away your bass, the tip touches gravel and dirt and spilled beer and french fry residue and mud and snow salt and bubble gum and WHO ELSE KNOWS what's been on that floor!  And every time you grab that cable, your hand leaves a little residue on that plug, and it gets pushed inside your jacks.

Another culprit, and possibly the worst to avoid, is gig smoke.  Cigarettes, smoke machines, hazers, they all circulate particles in the air, get blown inside your amp, and collect somewhere inside.  It's stuff like this, that makes regular maintenance a MUST to guarantee your gear stays playing.


If cleaning the jacks and plugs and knobs and switches doesn't solve it, THEN start to look for bad solders or broken cables or faulty gear.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2009, 02:18:00 PM by Bryan316 »

The new full-length album RECURRING THEMES out... Wait for it.... RIGHT NOW!
Go to www.ImminentSonicDestruction.com to order!!!
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Offline Bryan316

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« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2009, 09:47:58 AM »
HOW TO SOLDER CORRECTLY


Okay guys.  I like typing up information.

But I don't need to, here.

This Youtube video is the single best collection of information on soldering I've ever found.  Better than any book, magazine, or college instructor.  I can't possibly say it any better than these guys did here.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_NU2ruzyc4

The microscope camera shots are so impressive and reveal so much about HOW a solder actually bonds to the components.

I've bookmarked this video, emailed it home, and now immortalized it here.  I'm gonna try to download it at home to keep it permanently stored in case they ever take this down.

Even if you already have good soldering skills, the WHY information in here is impressive and invaluable.

The new full-length album RECURRING THEMES out... Wait for it.... RIGHT NOW!
Go to www.ImminentSonicDestruction.com to order!!!
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Offline Bryan316

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« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2009, 09:53:36 AM »
HOW TO CORRECTLY INSTALL SCHALLER STRAP LOCKS



First off, the screws involved. This shows you flat-out that the button screws provided by Schaller are INFERIOR. It's a #6 screw, 1" long. They are sized to fit their button, but not sized to be a sturdy anchor. If this supplied screw were tightened into a soft wood, I wouldn't trust it on a stage. But in maple or mahogany, you might get by. But for me, HELL NO. Why do something when you can overdo something?



I simply chucked the SS screw into my drill with the threads inside, turned on my bench grinder, and slowly turned the screw head sideways against the wheel until the head shrunk enough to tuck snug into the Schaller buttons. So easy.

Also, the #8 screw threads will not simply slip through the Schaller buttons.  So I needed to drill out the hole inside the buttons.  Simple as hell, just wrapped it with electrical tape to protect the finish, chucked it in the bench vise, and drilled out the hole with a drill bit just slightly larger than the hole.  I think the hole is 9/32" and I used a 3/16" drill bit.  I think.

Putting my new buttons on with my stainless steel screws.




These screws went into maple.  I'll be damned if I ever discover these buttons loosening up, cuz it took me a monumental effort to drive these screws in!  Holy crap were my hands sore from the screwdriver.  They're in for GOOD.

If you're putting these in soft woods like alder or ash or basswood, you better be pilot-hole drilling very carefully and putting the screw in with some wood glue.  Then you'll be good.

And remember, the longer the screw, the better the hold.  I used 1-1/2" screws, and they work great.  If you're doing a soft wood body, then definitely look around for 2" screws for the best assurance you can get that it'll hold securely.

Everyone I know who's had Schallers OR Dunlops fail on them, used the stock screws provided and had softer woods in their guitar bodies.  DO NOT USE THE STOCK SCREWS.  Take the extra time and effort to do it right, and it'll be the last time you ever install strap buttons on your most important piece of gear.


Here's the StrapLocks installed on my intended strap. Not sure if I'll keep using this strap with this bass, so I'm not using Loctite just yet.




This strap's two layers of leather stitched together. Had to shave it a bit to make the nut catch the base of the Straplock.




Side profile. Yeah, like I needed to tell you it was a side profile. Shu'up.






Remember... #8 screws, 1-1/2" long MINIMUM, drill out the strap button carefully to clear the threads of the #8 screw, grind down the screw head, deepen the hole with a pilot-hole bit around 1/16" diameter, use toothpicks and wood glue if your existing hole is beat up, and definitely use wood glue when driving the new screw into softer woods.

Minimal handyman skills needed here.  Nothing traumatic to your instrument or requiring anything more than a friend with a decent garage worth of tools.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2009, 09:58:22 AM by Bryan316 »

The new full-length album RECURRING THEMES out... Wait for it.... RIGHT NOW!
Go to www.ImminentSonicDestruction.com to order!!!
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Offline Bryan316

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« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2009, 08:32:32 AM »
HOW TO UPGRADE YOUR CABINET FROM BANANA POSTS TO SPEAKONS



So you're sick of your banana posts.  You want Speakons so you don't need to screw with those silly banana plugs or those obsolete, dangerous and deadly 1/4" plugs.

You can either order up some Speakons and attack that jack plate with spade drill bits and mangle that jack plate, or you can order up a brand new jack plate already upgraded with Speakon jacks installed in it!

For reference, here's my 210XLT with its Speakon-loaded plate:




And my elder 212XLT that needs some upgrading:




If you've been curious what the blood and guts of your cabinet looks like:




And here's your older banana-plug cab:



You'll notice on the left side, the brown and white wires leading to the banana posts.  Quite simple, and nothing impressive or scary here.  These two cables will directly swap over to the Speakon jacks' small PCB with tabs on its back.


First things first, disconnect the old jack plate from all the components.  If I remember correctly, you'll need a 14mm socket for the 1/4" jacks, a 12mm socket for the attenuator, and a 9mm for those banana posts or just pull the wires off their tabs.  Either way, get some metric sockets.  Deep-well and 6-point if you can, don't use 12-point sockets cuz they don't grip well on that attenuator's nut.  So damn small, slips off a lot.  It'll just frustrate you.  TRUST ME.




Here's the two wires on the banana posts.  Needle-nose pliers and they'll pop right off.




After the removal process:




And before the installation process:



You'll notice immediately, the bulky appearance of the Speakon setup.  YES, the attenuator will be close to the Speakons and the small circuit board.  NO, they should not touch when you assemble everything.


As quick reference, here's my 210XLT's setup, with a better shot of what the wiring looks like, and which wire goes where:




Here you can see the attenuator being very very close to the PCB, but it still doesn't touch.  And even if it did, the body is plastic where it would contact, so it won't even short anything.  Don't worry.  If you ARE concerned, just put some electrical tape in between to isolate them from each other.




If you've ever wondered what it would be like to pull the horn protection fuse, here it is!  Nothing fancy, folks.  It's just clipped there.  But you WILL need to wiggle it free using a fine screwdriver or pocket knife, cuz those clips are STRONG.




Allright, first things first.  Connect the loose wires to the Speakon jacks.  When in this orientation (basically upside down) the wires will connect in this order.  Brown/black to the outside near-the-edge tab, and white wire to the inside tab.




Next, let's put the attenuator back.  Remember the star washer goes to the underside of the jack plate, between it and the attenuator.  The attenuator has a longer-than-needed post, so they have a jam nut to set the depth of the post after it sticks through the plate.  That star washer should be resting against that jam nut.  That shouldn't be anything you need to fiddle with, since the old and new jack plates are the same plastic thickness.




Here's the tricky part.  Putting the 1/4" jacks back through.



Now, this new jack plate has an entirely different hole pattern.  the attenuator hole is a bit lower, and the 1/4" jack holes are a bit wider. LET ME EMPHASIZE THIS AS STRONGLY AS POSSIBLE:  THIS IS WHERE YOU MUST BE CAREFUL!!!  I needed to take everything back apart, and use a 3/8" drill bit to make the 1/4" jack holes more oval.  The holes needed to be closer to each other.  So I used the sidewall of the 3/8" bit to grind away at the hole, and oval it out a bit.  IT ONLY NEEDED A LITTLE BIT OF CUTTING HERE!  DO NOT OVERDO IT!  You should only make a few bits of plastic chips doing this.  Do it a little, test fit.  Do a little more, test fit.


Hardest work done.  Reassembled:




Now, this next step, I wasn't too worried about.  But I did it anyway.  The old label showing the model number, serial number, and wattage and ohm rating.  It's worth saving, so it's time to do a bit of finesse work here.  This COULD be done by calling up USM and telling them to print out and send you the black sticker version with your old serial number, but I wanted to have some fun here.  Plus, they'd probably ask for proof of the serial number anyway.  Besides, this way is more fun!

Now remember, WHO CARES ABOUT THE REMAINDER OF THE STICKER!  You're not doing this for resale value or collectible value.  Screw that.  You want safe, capable cabinets.  Right?  So slice the old jack plate's label sharp and clean, and scrape away the label surrounding the piece you want to keep.  It should peel right off from the plate.  But still, go slow and cautiously here:




It should be very easy, using the point of the blade, to stick this back down over the label of the new jack plate:




Just tuck it into the top right corner, stick it down tight, and BLAMMO!  Upgrade complete!




Don't forget the custom acoustically treated foam jack sealants.  [:D]


The new full-length album RECURRING THEMES out... Wait for it.... RIGHT NOW!
Go to www.ImminentSonicDestruction.com to order!!!
Eden WT550, WTB400

Offline Bassmann1968

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« Reply #10 on: December 23, 2009, 05:05:58 AM »
BIAS SETTING E300T

Here's a link to a YouTube video of the founder walking through some of the amps and cabinets. About half way through, he shows the guy from Premiere Guitar the E300T. He turns it around and gives a quick run through of the method used to set the bias. Worth a look...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNiycKMmGRQ


(THX to Dan and Dale for bringing this up [;)])
« Last Edit: December 23, 2009, 05:11:50 AM by Bassmann1968 »
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Offline lowfsharp

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« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2010, 12:44:04 AM »
http://www.sadowsky.com/audio/impedance.html

I just go to the link above and let the calculator do all the math !
Thanks to Vinny who posted this link years ago



WT - 405 ,Alembic F1X preamp , EBS MicroBass2preamp ,Samson S1000 poweramp , SWR Henry Jr 4x8 , MarkBass N.Y-604 x2


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Offline Elliot

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Re: The Big Sticky Thread of BASS FAQ's!
« Reply #12 on: May 25, 2012, 09:13:50 PM »
U are out of your mind! BUT HEY! I really appreciate the time you took to lay out some cool stuff! Thank You Bro. Your really appreciated. But still out of your mind anyhow. (it means your cool) thanks for your time.
Harry Marcial, Shadowsky NYC Vintage5, Fender Gold Precision Elite, MM Sterling, Eden WT1205, X2 Eden D210XLT, Bergantino HT322.

Offline Bryan316

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Re: The Big Sticky Thread of BASS FAQ's!
« Reply #13 on: May 29, 2012, 09:28:09 AM »
Being out of your mind can be helpful for getting out of felony charges!  "Sorry, your honor, I'm outta my mind, and here's the message board opinions to prove it!!!"


By the way, gang, if you're building pedal boards, or trying to run three or four cables alongside each other for long runs, I wanna FULLY ENDORSE This stuff:

Techflex 3/4" Expandable Sleeving 25 ft. Neon Yellow
http://www.parts-express.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?Partnumber=082-378



It's a huge spool of Chinese Finger Trap!  You shove your cables through it, and it keeps them bundled together.  However, it's not a firm, stiff grip like that corkscrew spiral wrap, making it unflexible and impossible to coil up.  It expands to allow your plug ends and connectors to push through without having to grease it up just to slip through.  I did Pete's keyboards, vocals, and return line, to run across the stage back to the in-ear monitor box.  That alone will kill tons of confusion at setup!  The Techflex sits loose around the cables so everything is perfectly flexible.  It's much easier to handle than even a stage snakebox's thick cable.

I first used this for Tony's pedalboard, and I'm intending to do the same for Scott's amp and vocals next.  I'm also ordering some in 3/8" diameter for short runs between the keyboard stands back up to Pete's mixing board.  Should also look cool to see a bunch of bright yellow runs all over his keys!

Here's a PDF spec sheet for the product.

The new full-length album RECURRING THEMES out... Wait for it.... RIGHT NOW!
Go to www.ImminentSonicDestruction.com to order!!!
Eden WT550, WTB400