Author Topic: Sound clips  (Read 27995 times)

Offline Har

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« Reply #15 on: April 29, 2005, 10:55:54 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by Vinny D

Anyone got pictures to show us inquiring minds[?]

Yep! Here's a couple of mine; it's a 10-string rosewood Stick with Deep Matched Reciprical Tuning (lowest playable note on the bass side is a deep Bb [:)]...you can't really play open strings on a Stick so that's the lowest frettable note) and standard pickup:



--Har
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Offline Clbe

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« Reply #16 on: April 29, 2005, 12:16:38 PM »
Stick in action....



Clbe


[img=left]http://clbe.net/edenlogobullet.gif[/img=left]

Christopher L. Browne

Inside Sales Manager

Fender Jazz 4 * Rickenbacker 4001 * Conklin Groove Tools 7 * Conklin Groove Tools 5 Fretless * Carvin Claro Walnut LB75 * Cort MEB Acoustic * Chapman Stick 10 * Nemesis NC410

Offline Vinny D

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« Reply #17 on: April 29, 2005, 06:07:38 PM »
Cool pics, What does one of those things sell for?

Vinny

http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeek9mb/vinnysbasspage/

Offline Har

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« Reply #18 on: April 30, 2005, 01:33:04 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by Vinny D

Cool pics, What does one of those things sell for?

Here's the current pricelist on the SE website:

http://www.stick.com/prices/

--Har
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Offline Vinny D

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« Reply #19 on: April 30, 2005, 08:20:15 AM »

Offline LaneOnBass

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« Reply #20 on: April 30, 2005, 10:49:02 AM »
By the way, that's a picture of the lovely and talented Mr. Browne in action. He leads a double life: mild-mannered sales manager by day, Rock God by night.

<I know I am *so* going to pay for this...>

Keep Thumpin',

Lane Baldwin
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and Forum Moderator


Ask not what bass can do for you...
   Ask what YOU can do for bass.

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Lane On Bass

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Offline puffycombs

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« Reply #21 on: April 30, 2005, 02:29:11 PM »
smoke and lights... looks good.  So, now it's time for a real heart to heart with myself.  saving up for wt-800, but....... sigh.  I wonder if I could pick up a basics of stick leason here locally.  there's got to be someone that would be able to point me in the right direction.  The other issue is, can I convince my current band to let me play it live or in the studio.  Probably not is my guess, they bearly like my 5 string.  Still, that thing is SWEET!!!!!!!.  I'm sure I could play it at church.. yeah, that's it.  The wife would support that!
don't confuse understanding with concern.

Offline Clbe

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« Reply #22 on: May 01, 2005, 10:09:48 AM »
Puffy - the Stick for me was a head cleaving experience. A new Stick will come with an excellent training book that works for beginner up to advanced players. Just keep in mind... piano piano piano...

As for a band scenario - it has a distinct sound! It took my band a while to get used to it and it became clear that it works naturally for some tunes and requires some adaptability for other tunes.

Oh and if you need a working example of spousal support - my wife bought me my Stick as a christmas present. She's so cool.

Clbe


[img=left]http://clbe.net/edenlogobullet.gif[/img=left]

Christopher L. Browne

Inside Sales Manager

Fender Jazz 4 * Rickenbacker 4001 * Conklin Groove Tools 7 * Conklin Groove Tools 5 Fretless * Carvin Claro Walnut LB75 * Cort MEB Acoustic * Chapman Stick 10 * Nemesis NC410

Offline LaneOnBass

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« Reply #23 on: May 01, 2005, 11:53:19 AM »
She is definitely cool, Chris. Obviously very supportive.

Keep Thumpin',

Lane Baldwin
Special Projects Coordinator
and Forum Moderator


Ask not what bass can do for you...
   Ask what YOU can do for bass.

www.laneonbass.com
Keep Thumpin',

Lane On Bass

Former Eden Spec. Proj. Coord. & Artist Relations

My Web Site | Facebook Page
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Offline Har

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« Reply #24 on: May 01, 2005, 03:32:36 PM »
My wife had actually been encouraging me to finally get a Stick for years, after hearing me endlessly whine about how much I wanted one [;)], and helped us work out the right time financially to order it....very, very wonderfully supportive. For that matter, she was also the one who told me "That sounds fantastic...you need to get this!" when I was trying out the CXC210 I just bought. [:)]
(I always feel sorry for guys who say things like "man, I really need to get this piece of gear...now all I have to do is sneak it past my wife...")

Anyway: also worth looking into is the set of Bob Culbertson training videos that you can get directly from SE. There are three of them (beginner, intermediate, advanced); I got the set when I first ordered my Stick and watched them during the 4 months waiting period before it arrived, so by the time it finally was in my hands I had a pretty solid idea of how to jump in.
(FYI: depending on their production runs when you order a new Stick, it can take a while before it arrives, based on various factors like type of wood you wanted and its availability, etc. But definitely worth the wait, considering that these are basically hand-made instruments still built in Emmett Chapman's home shop. And the after-purchase support is wonderful: Emmett himself actually called me at work to discuss a problem I had contacted them about...not every day one of your musicial heros calls YOU for a friendly, leasurely chat about playing technique, etc [:)])

--Har
http://www.ambientguitarist.com

Offline puffycombs

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« Reply #25 on: May 02, 2005, 01:24:05 PM »
the wife is very supportive of the music.  that's why I'm was looking at a wt-800, on her advice.  I was also looking at the lightwave music web sight checking into that tech. and reading about what it is and such, listening to the demo's and she looked over my sholder and said, "one of those would be cool."  Now coming up with a couple of grand to buy a new stick is another story.  Especially if it's just a toy for my living room.  I'll have to start dropping hints.  I wonder if I could find one around here to look at and get my hands on.  That would probably convince her pretty easily.  she's in charge of our music at church and would probably decide that we have to have one in the band.
don't confuse understanding with concern.

Offline milkman

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« Reply #26 on: May 02, 2005, 01:24:58 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by puffycombs

smoke and lights... looks good.  So, now it's time for a real heart to heart with myself.  saving up for wt-800, but....... sigh.  I wonder if I could pick up a basics of stick leason here locally.  there's got to be someone that would be able to point me in the right direction.  The other issue is, can I convince my current band to let me play it live or in the studio.  Probably not is my guess, they bearly like my 5 string.



That's why I like the NS Stick.  It's almost like an introductory stick.  (I say that lightly)  But it is a very good transition from bass to stick playing, you can play it diagonally/horizontially like a bass and it has a defeatable string damper.  On a "normal" stick the damper is almost always on, preventing you from playing open notes, but the NS Stick allows you to engage/disengage the damper on the fly.  It's also "usually" tuned in fourths like a bass B-E-A-D-G-C-F-Bb (this of course can vary).

Now I just need two grand to buy one :)

Anyone wanna give me a WT-400???
Beware the fiscal array.

Offline Har

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« Reply #27 on: May 02, 2005, 04:00:13 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by puffycombs

Now coming up with a couple of grand to buy a new stick is another story.  Especially if it's just a toy for my living room.  I'll have to start dropping hints.


Well, another thing to keep in consideration is perhaps getting a used one from SE: they sometimes get trade-backs/trade-ups, which Emmett then works on to ensure that it's in great condition and set up perfectly, and carries the same warrenty as the new ones. Depending on the models the prices can then vary. See: http://www.stick.com/instruments/used/

quote:
Originally posted by puffycombs

I wonder if I could find one around here to look at and get my hands on.  That would probably convince her pretty easily.  she's in charge of our music at church and would probably decide that we have to have one in the band.


Good luck finding any used ones in any local music stores...if on the off chance one does land in a store that way, it usually flies right back out again just as fast. [;)] I spent literally decades looking around for such a situation to arise and eventually gave up and wound up just taking the plunge, buying a new one before ever actually getting my hands on one.

However, depending on where you live, it still may be possible to track down someone near you who owns one and who might be willing to let you try playing his/hers...seems the Stick community in general is quite friendly and sometimes are happy to help "new converts" in that way. [:)] The StickWire list (link on the Stick site under Forums) might be a good place to post a request to see if perhaps you could find someone who lives nearby who could help you that way.
And/or: if you're ever near the yearly NAMM show in California, SE usually has a big booth there with hands-on demos where they strap one on you with a set of headphones and let you give it a try.
(or, if you're ever in California near SE itself, perhaps try giving them a call and asking them if you could stop by and talk to them!)

--Har
http://www.ambientguitarist.com

Offline puffycombs

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« Reply #28 on: May 02, 2005, 06:27:50 PM »
probably should start a new thread, cuz I'm totally getting off topic here... but  is the fattest string in the middle?  meanin that starting at the edge of fretboard, the strings get progressivly lower in pitch going toward the middle?
don't confuse understanding with concern.

Offline Har

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« Reply #29 on: May 02, 2005, 10:03:33 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by puffycombs

probably should start a new thread, cuz I'm totally getting off topic here... but  is the fattest string in the middle?  meanin that starting at the edge of fretboard, the strings get progressivly lower in pitch going toward the middle?


yes, the deepest strings are in the middle, but you need to keep in mind that in general the Stick is really two separate sets of strings: bass and melody/guitar...and both sets go from deepest in the center going outwards to thinnest/highest pitched on the outside. Which also makes the bass side run backwards to what most bassists are used to: looking down at the fretboard, the thickest/deepest string is the furthest away from you and the highest pitched one the closest to you, instead of the other way around like on a "normal" bass.

(however, note that there are also other versions of the Stick that do have more "standard" bass tunings if desired. I actually made a point of intentionally NOT getting anything like that, because I wanted to look at the instrument as something unique in its own right, not just as some kind of "super-bass")

So if you think of a 10-string Stick as an example, it's not really one long continuous set of 10 strings that starts out thin/higher-pitched on one side, gets progressively deeper until reaching the center of the fretboard and then starts becoming thin/higher-pitched again until reaching the opposite end...so, it's not like you'd somehow play a long scale starting on one side of the neck and work your way all the way across all 10 strings. [;)]

Instead, better to think of it as one 5-string set of bass strings tuned in ascending 5ths (in the case of "Classic" 10-string Stick tuning) who's domain tends to be your left hand....which happens to also be side-by-side on the same fretboard with a 5-string set of melody/guitar strings tuned in descending 4ths, which tends to be played with your right hand....as Clbe said...think piano, and of the way your hands would land on a piano keyboard with the deeper notes under your left hand and the higher ones under your right, but played by percussively tapping downwards on the strings in a similar physical manner that your fingers would strike downwards onto the piano keys.
And right there you've got the basic concept of the Stick in a nutshell: this dual string-set system allows you to play two independent lines with both hands in the same way you would on a piano, only you're hitting strings, not keys. [:)]
(and since the Stick also has a split pickup, you can also send erach side out to two different amps, two diffrent sets of effects, etc)
Though, there aren't hard/fast rules here: you can also just as well use both hands on the bass side tapping out percussively rhytmic parts in tandem (the technique Tony Levin is famous for), or both hands on the melody/guitar side to play intricate melody parts.

By the way, there are quite a few different types of Stick tunings, as well as numbers of Strings. You can read a detailed explanation of all of them including useful graphical charts explaining how the strings are, on the Stick site here: http://www.stick.com/instruments/tunings/

In particular, this is the one I use...10-String Deep Matched Reciprocalâ„¢, AKA "DMR":
http://www.stick.com/instruments/tunings/10/dmr/

I'd also recommend checking the various articles here by Emmett Chapman (the inventor of the Stick) and others...you'll find some really useful explanations of the various basic concepts behind the instrument:
http://www.stick.com/articles/
http://www.stick.com/history/

(wow, what a long verbose post...sorry about that! [:)])

--Har
http://www.ambientguitarist.com